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    For decades, San Diegans have debated alternatives to the city’s landlocked downtown airport and pushed solutions as radical as a floating one.

    Now a group of Mexican and U.S. investors, including Chicago billionaire Sam Zell, has gotten the official go-ahead to build a cross-border bridge that at least partly address the longtime quandary by making it easier for San Diegans and Mexicans to fly out of Tijuana’s General Abelardo L. Rodriguez International Airport.

    The plan isn’t new. It’s been more than 20 years in the making. Mexico’s airport authority even proposed a strikingly similar Otay Mesa connection about 15 years before business and city leaders on our side of the border coalesced behind it.

    Here’s a guide to San Diego and Tijuana’s coming cross-border bridge.


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    The What and Where

    Image courtesy Otay-Tijuana Venture LLC
    Image courtesy of Otay-Tijuana Venture LLC

    Developers envision a two-story facility on a now barren 55-acre parcel in Otay Mesa that abuts the border and sits directly across from Tijuana’s airport.

    The U.S. side will be bustling in less than two years if investors have their way. The two-level airport crossing building will house a U.S. Customs and Border Protection processing hub, offices, ticketing counters, retail stores – and of course, the crucial 390-foot bridge to Tijuana’s airport.

    They’re also planning roads with ample space to drop off and pick up travelers, plus parking and rental car options.

    Image courtesy Otay-Tijuana Venture LLC
    Image courtesy of Otay-Tijuana Venture LLC

    But this two-level structure will take up less than half of the property. The investors may add restaurants, stores or even a hotel later if there’s demand.

    On the other side of the border fence, the Tijuana airport is being renovated to accommodate the pedestrian bridge and immigration processing facilities. There’s also an expansion under way.

    The Forces Behind It

    Leaders from both countries want greater connectivity but they haven’t always been on the same page.

    In the early 1990s, then-City Councilman Ron Roberts pushed a plan known as TwinPorts, essentially a binational airport on the border, that crumbled under criticism from then-County Supervisor Brian Bilbray, then-City Councilman Bob Filner and the U.S. government. Mexican officials ultimately decided they weren’t interested either, and in 1991 recommended a Tijuana airport expansion and a terminal entrance on the San Diego side.

    Here are a couple renderings from that report, which envisioned a passageway from the U.S. to Mexico.

    Image courtesy Kenn Morris
    Image courtesy of Kenn Morris

     

    Image courtesy Kenn Morris
    Image courtesy of Kenn Morris

    Tijuana airport operators soon moved forward with their own development plans, adding two runways for jumbo jets.

    And San Diego officials kept brainstorming.  A few other stateside airport ideas – including that infamous floating airport – came up over the next two decades but didn’t stick. Then, in 2006, the county Airport Authority committee announced it wanted to look into that cross-border airport terminal. An airport study later found easier access to the Tijuana airport wouldn’t put a damper on business at San Diego’s Lindbergh Field airport.

    Business groups, including the Chamber of Commerce, the South County EDC and their Mexican counterparts, publicly touted the idea.

    The Otay-Tijuana Venture LLC, an investor group that includes the operator of the Tijuana airport and Zell, picked up the torch in 2008 when it purchased the land in Otay Mesa. It’s been working on development plans, high-profile permits and complex agreements with customs officials on both sides of the border ever since.

    How It’ll Work

    The cross-border airport pathway will work much like San Diego’s border crossings in San Ysidro and Otay Mesa with one major exception: You’ll need a Tijuana airline ticket to use the pedestrian bridge.

    There will also be a fee to cross. Charges between $13 and $17 each way have been publicly floated but a spokeswoman for the investor group declined to say whether facility operators are still eyeing costs in that range.

    U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers are expected to man the facility about 20 hours a day, seven days a week once the facility opens but expect to up their hours as more travelers use it, said Pete Flores, the agency’s director of field operations for San Diego.

    Flores said the investor group has agreed to foot all associated public safety costs and to construct necessary facilities for officers.

    Who Will Use It

    Past market research by the developers revealed that more than half of the roughly 4 million travelers who fly out of the Tijuana airport annually cross the border to catch their flight or come to the U.S. at some point during their visit.

    A January New York Times story noted  just how many Americans use the Mexican airport, and why:

    Each year, 2.4 million travelers from the United States use the Tijuana airport, even if it means waiting for hours at the border. They provide the airport with nearly 60 percent of its traffic.

    It is worth the trouble for those people because fares in Tijuana are substantially lower — up to 50 percent less to fly throughout Mexico — than at San Diego’s Lindbergh Field or other airports, like Los Angeles International.

    Using those assumptions, the investors backing the airport bridge estimated about 1.7 million TIJ passengers will use their facility to get to the Tijuana airport each year.

    Flores anticipates the bridge will also help ease congestion and long lines at the San Ysidro and Otay Mesa ports of entry.

    Kenn Morris, who leads the business consulting firm Crossborder Group and regularly studies binational trends, said he expects the majority of pedestrian bridge users will be Mexican travelers visiting Southern California or U.S. residents vacationing in Mexico.

    When It’ll Be a Reality

    The investors conquered their last major roadblock in March when they reached an agreement with Customs and Border Protection.

    Still, developers have been mum on when construction will start. The commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection may have spilled the beans at a round-table discussion last month when he said the State Department notified Mexico that construction would start in May.

    A spokeswoman for the development group wouldn’t confirm that timeframe.

    Whenever construction does start, it’s projected to span about 15 months, meaning the cross-border facility is unlikely to be open for business until at least late summer 2015.

      This article relates to: Border, Border Connectivity, Border Crossing, Government, News, Otay Mesa, Share

      Written by Lisa Halverstadt

      Lisa Halverstadt is a reporter at Voice of San Diego. Know of something she should check out? You can contact her directly at lisa@vosd.org or 619.325.0528.

      45 comments
      Steven Croft
      Steven Croft subscriber

      Anytime a billionaire can make a profit out of sending jobs out of the country somehow it is portrayed as a good thing. There is no benefit to me as a San Diego County resident or to our future generations to have our airport jobs and revenue sent out of the country. Maybe Sam Zell should think more about the working class people in this country then his own profit. Our countries manufacturing industry has been almost eliminated, our small farms have met the same fate and our domestic  construction industry is going in the same direction. What's next  out sourcing our governments operations, military and everything else to another country where does it stop? It doesn't look good for our future generations what will they do for a living what kind of future will this region have.

      Richard del Rio
      Richard del Rio subscriber

      @Steven Croft  Is the reason for 2+ hour border waits to protect San Diego jobs or subsidize American airline companies? The creation of easier border crossings for everyone is an economic benefit for the region. Please name a reputable economist who would argue that a more efficient pedestrian bridge to an airport will have any negative impact. 

      taruguetes
      taruguetes

      @Susanitadlraton Esa historia me la contaron y según lo que vi, eran obras relacionadas con esta noticia. "Habremos" de esperar.

      Bill Bradshaw
      Bill Bradshaw subscribermember

      Like a lot of the commentators, I’ve used Rodriguez field and found it fine.  This is simply an added convenience and I’ll pay up to use it as long as Mexican air fares remain substantially below U.S. fares.  

      The discussion about Lindbergh field is old news.  It’s there, it’s the most convenient airport in the U.S. despite the infamous “single runway” that’s closed maybe 2 times per year because of dense fog, and the idea that there’s somewhere we haven’t looked as an alternative simply invites another “search” boondoggle.  There’s only one viable alternative, and Miramar is very difficult politically so probably wouldn’t happen if the Marines decided to vacate.

      If you were running an airline that had lots of overseas flights and already had flights from LAX, would you originate overseas flights from San Diego?  Of course not, you’d tell people to take a shuttle flight for another 200 bucks or so and pocket more profits.  This wouldn’t change with a bigger airport here.    

      Cindy Conger
      Cindy Conger subscriber

      @Bill Bradshaw   Think of the 'benefits' for the marines and for the military here to get their own personnel aound....with a real transit paid for by the Federal Taxes within our own county.  Why does every other city 'build its own airport?'  Such visions.include.less pollution (meeting our air quality stds.-instead of 'forcing each homeowner' to put in $tens of thousands to 'help meet the standards' -which they are pushing for!), people that could 'communicate' face to face more...meeting in transit. (vs. costs of maintaining, adding to ,widening and constantly having to pay for more roads, with more traffic. Less cost for goods, foods, etc. in sending/receiving them first by Diesel Truck to LA or Ontario, then by their airlines, paying their 'landing fees'..why don't you think of taking care of all of SD's 'needs' first? 

      Fact: The 'airlines' input' was Ignored in the last 'vote on the airlines.'  Developers who have been' waiting to carve up Miramar for decades to build housing in' (per former ATC) most likely Paid those who put in so much false 'Propaganda' about 'affecting UC/Miramar,' advertised on our former Sole Media...most of SD residents were clueless about the real 'consequences' of Not having a real Airport (full sized 3500 acres with 2 runways, affecting NO homes) with the Real Stability in Revenues that run a successful economy.  The Airlines have already SAID, they Do Not Want to have a 'divided airport sites' in San Diego..they Do want a Centralized one...as well, the cargo airlines. 

      Fact: Our 'smaller aircraft' have been Denied Access to LAX already. Ontario was the last airport able to expand. ALL Southern CA airports will very Soon be "At Capacity, with No room for expansion." Planning for the Future is what's needed. If San Diego wants 'Business' to stay or to grow, it must think longer term than 20 yrs...the BS that they fed Qualcomm & Sorrento Mesa businesses was fraudulent.  Any airport would be built 4-4.5 miles to the southeast of Miramar's runway..affecting no one...benefitting all.  What happens, my late father said (prior SD City Asst. Mgr.), when Rodriquez Airport "baggage handlers" have a 'labor strike?'

      Guess who's 'out of everything?'  Do you Really want to Give Up Control of this County's Cargo needs...to a Foreign Country?  Wake Up San Diegans, please.

      Cindy Conger
      Cindy Conger subscriber

      @Bill Bradshaw LAX has too many 'flights' (near capacity)...for their county & surrounding counties.  We have Brawley, Imperial and part of Riverside that could and would benefit, as well as our own county...from a Real Airport here.  Another $200?  For businesses with repeat air cargo needs...it's not just a small fee...and it adds up.  For business travelers, why do you think SD is the 'step child' of CA? Because it's so difficult/expensive to get politicians here! When was the last time we had a CA politico's convention here? Never?  I remember one, maybe 35 years ago? Why does Sacramento have high Walls all along residential fronts to their freeways? Transportation taxes....and they  now come from all of SD's Cargo (less than 1-3% go via Lindbergh's unfilled passenger jets..because the larger planes Can't Take Off 'fully loaded' with fuel, passengers and cargo....for them SD is a Loss, not a money-maker.  There are so few Cargo Flights here vs. any other '3+ million population' city...wake up & think more about the Losses we Will be Experiencing here!

      Richard del Rio
      Richard del Rio subscriber

      This is a good idea that will benefit both sides of the border. The cost and benefits are favorable despite an obnoxious surcharge for crossing. However it does little or nothing to address the dilemna of everyday people who want to cross the border for everyday reasons--visiting family, tourism, work and shopping. The U.S. government should be ashamed of how it lets border waits approach 2-3 hours. This has been a problem for over a decade. The only seeming explanation is bureaucratic inertia (not staffing, funding, security, the rules etc…). That people are treated this way is simply unacceptable. If the constituents affected were organized special interests, as in this scenario for an airport crossing, the waits would not exceed 15-30 minutes. Mayor Faulconer, congressmen, senators and our other elected officials give lip service to resolving these issues but fail to unite around the simple concept of serving the people based on demand. People want to cross the border in a reasonable amount of time for lawful reasons. 

      Cindy Conger
      Cindy Conger subscriber

      @Richard del Rio San Diego has little money for 'additional border crossings' in its 'transportation funding,'

      giving it all away to Mexico and Zell (for 'customs') will Not Add a penny for crossings.  They will be looking for their own 'funding needs' or much later, after they 'make profits' on our missing transportation system, they might think of 'the people.'  Real solutions must be thought out...long term first, to short term....and we've seen no 'real plans' that benefit San Diego....only the profiteers of public money.

      Richard del Rio
      Richard del Rio subscriber

      @Cindy Conger @Richard del Rio  This is not a giveaway to Mexico. The beneficiaries are the people on both sides of the border who want to use an airport in a somewhat efficient way. The private funding model means the users are paying the costs not the local and state governments. We can discuss whether the federal government should be funding the U.S. portion rather than leasing the responsibility to a private interest. Personally I would prefer a public model built and maintained by the federal government. Nevertheless this project is plainly in San Diego's economic interest as an investment in the infrastructure of border crossings. The cost to the region of needless delays comes with a high price in lost business activity, jobs and tax revenue.

      Cindy Conger
      Cindy Conger subscriber

      @Kathy S Yes, Kathy.  His point..'don't know that "We'll" make a lot of money on it," meaning San Diego...is doubtful to make any 'revenues' from it...while Mexico will, and Sam Will, no doubt.  Billionaires don't do anything that's super 'risky' with their money, do they?

      Edward Teyssier
      Edward Teyssier subscriber

      VOSD doesn't know what it's talking about.  SAN is _not_
      "hard to get into and out of."    Unlike so many other major cities, our airport is located very close to downtown and our always expanding convention center and hotels, etc., so has many convenient shuttles that are readily available.  Yes, the trolley doesn't go there, but that's by design.

      FWIW, San Diego doesn't need and doesn't want a big airport...the airlines would still use LAX as their closest hub no matter what San Diego builds, or where it build it, whether out in the ocean or in the desert.   A result dictated by the laws of physics, aerodynamics and economics, politics aside. 

      Cindy Conger
      Cindy Conger subscriber

      @Edward Teyssier "By design?"  Why, so the taxis can get more business?  So the city doesn't have 'filled hotels'? So people at the airport 'can't use' the Trolley to lessen traffic or to enjoy viewing SD and its many attractive locals while sitting comfortably on transit?  (ie. Old Town to SDSU-with great views?) A-2 runway airport is Not a "Big airport." 3500 acres is less than 1/2 the size of most airports the size of SD!  The airlines will Not Be Able to use LAX Edward.  When are you going to 'get it?'  They're Already Turning Down our 'smaller aircraft' from landing!  By 2020-5 ALL SOUTHERN CA Airports will be "AT CAPACITY". 

      Edward Teyssier
      Edward Teyssier subscriber

      @Cindy Conger @Edward Teyssier Hello Cindy, 

      Ahhem.. Who's not "getting it?"  Yes, the powers that be decided NOT to allow the trolley to go to the airport so that the taxi's and others could make more money.  They also did not want to allow SAN to become any bigger so that they could justify creating an "Airport Authority" and move SAN to Miramar.  After all, Alan Bersin needed a job with cushy benenfits..only they didn't count on the voters nixing that idea.  And using the MCRD property to expand the airport?  Well,  that would have just made SAN more capable, so we couldn't have THAT, now could we?  So the City gave that all away to McMillan & Co.  Yes, another _brilliant_ move by our Keystone Kouncil !  


      You say, "the airlines will Not Be Able to use LAX?"  Oh, really"?!   Gee, last time I was there, seeing someone off on an international fight,  I saw all sorts of airplanes representing airlines from all over the world. So,  I think the airlines are using, and will continue to use,  LAX quite a bit, actually.  

      Cindy Conger
      Cindy Conger subscriber

      @Edward Teyssier @Cindy Conger Yes Edward, LAX will always be used, but Not by San Diegans. ' At Capacity' means they have too many aircraft serving Local LA County residents, no more 'short hop' flights. And as our 2nd highest traveled route,SD to OC/LA has been ignored by the 'CA Rail' project and stalled, again, it'll be another 20-30 years for that to even begin here...being that we're the 'last in line' for everything via the State's priorities.  Prove me wrong?  Even if our North County's Palomar Airport ever gets the ok to go longer, they also will not meet the requirements for larger, (profitable for the airlines) aircraft.  It will be another 20-40 years or longer before even a percentage of the airlines will afford (or want to) to get a majority of their aircraft built to some greater ability to land in a small airport, a large aircraft.  So the traffic...to OC/LA will get worse.  We'll be forced to go in and out of TJ....giving another Country, a third world country in terms of negotiating skills, non-violent society and criminal activity...the financial stability that San Diego has long deserved.  Without planning for such and effectively distributing such 'relied upon revenues' by any other 'over 1,000,000 population city, San Diego will never be the 'finest' of anything.  The 'sunshine tax' has long lost its 'value.'

      You might have a bit to learn about flying...ever take lessons? The airlines can't get their smaller aircraft 'profitable full loads' out of Lindbergh because of the runway's 'landing constraints.'  Getting MCRD?  That would help in landing or taking off? Wow, you really have no clue.  Another heading runway that might be built with it gone, might have to deal with wind shears off the cliffs of Mission Hills, as well as the high rise obstacles and I-5.  No 'expansions' to even go longer than its 7600' of 'usable runway' would ever 'fit' into the mud flats of Lindbergh enough now.  Wind directions for take off (and most landings-we are the Only Major Metropolitan Airport in the World to have 'Head to Head Operations!-Making us the Most Dangerous!), Require heading into the West.

      The rise in elevation at the 'West End' of runway would require filling in a channel and plowing right through homes (there before Lindbergh) that do make up one of the most profitable tax bases for the County and City of San Diego. So you're ready to 'sacrifice' that, too?  Have you ever taken an engineering class?  You really can't 'land' into a slope going 'up', very easily with large aircraft...for the same reason that you can't bring rail over the mountains & down them, otherwise, wouldn't we have a 'high speed train' out to an airport in 'El Centro'? 

      Cindy Conger
      Cindy Conger subscriber

      @Edward Teyssier @Cindy Conger   Oh,and the 'powers that be' really are those that are running have been 'running the city' for the past 15-20 yrs. Investor Developers...many from out of state, who've been watching to 'divide up Miramar's 23,000 and surrounding areas of 41,000 ACRES (already 20,000 of those are owned by Developers) for housing development' for the past 20 years or more (via an ATC, retired)!

      Just think, 64,000 more Acres of Housing, a minimum of 1,300,000 more units, at 3 persons each=4,000,000 people added to the middle of our County ....with NO Transit, No Airport but Lindbergh to travel In Gridlock to!

      A future LA, fast in the making....what I watched OC become..and who's 'running Sandag', the 'planners?'  LA/OC transplants?

      Gaby Dow
      Gaby Dow subscribermember

      This project, and overall improved border crossing, is long overdue. And the racist jokes, well...

      Donald Kimball
      Donald Kimball subscribermember

      This is a good idea. Our Otay Mesa and San Yisidro boarder crossings are very busy. There is a enough boarder crossing traffic just to and from the TJ airport to merit this infrastructure. I look forward to easily crossing the boarder and taking a business trip flight to Mexico City.

      Matty Azure
      Matty Azure subscriber

      I'll never use that bridge.  I'm perfectly happy crossing the border in the existing tunnel.

      Signed,

      Cu Chi Tunnel Rat

      Cindy Conger
      Cindy Conger subscriber

      What, no questions from the 8 people listening?

      msginsd
      msginsd subscriber

      @Cindy Conger  Nope.  No question from me.  I'm one of the millions who use Rodriguez when I fly within Mexico and will continue to do so.  This development just makes it that much easier.  And I'm also one of the many many residents who don't want (and voted that way) an international airport at East Elliot.   Luckily that horse is dead.

      msginsd
      msginsd subscriber

      @spoonman Because I don't believe it was needed and because it would be a major disruption to the surrounding areas.  Military use of Miramar may not be ideal, but it's a far better and less disruptive use than an international airport with hundreds of more flights daily along with a major shift in both air and ground traffic patterns.


      I get that Cindy Conger wants SAN gone so that she have quiet in Pt. Loma and sell more pricey homes, but SAN is in a convenient location, serves its purpose as a destination airport, and was there long before her.   And frankly, for a real estate agent  to complain about others making profits is just plain hypocritical.


      spoonman
      spoonman subscriber

      @msginsd @spoonman Eventually SAN will not be adequate. Sure the timeframe for that is debatable, but it will happen. We can't rely on TIJ and LAX...they have their own issues to worry about. Knowing that, where do you propose to put the inevitable new airport in the future?

      msginsd
      msginsd subscriber

      @spoonman @msginsd  I disagree with your premise.   I see nothing to suggest that SAN will cease to serve it's purpose in an adequate way.  

      spoonman
      spoonman subscriber

      @msginsd @spoonman Yes of course. The airport will serve San Diego forever and never reach capacity (sarcasm).


      When the airport is overloaded, and we need a larger airport, there will be no available land, and you will have yourself to blame. Of course maybe you don't care because it will not happen in your lifetime. You can slough that problem off on the next generation.

      Cindy Conger
      Cindy Conger subscriber

      @msginsd @spoonman 'Disruption?' Nope. Lived in Mira Mesa & always thought, as a Civil Air Patrol member, that outside Miramar's 23,000 & the surrounding 41,000 ACRES, there is Plenty of Room for an airport 4.5 Miles to the Southwest of Miramar's runway.  Took a tour there (east side of the runway) and Everyone, even the 'Leader of Anti-Miramar vote', now with the

      AA also stated, along with every pilot I've known-that it wouldn't 'affect' any flights out of Miramar.  The 'shift' would also be south of the present one. If you, Spoonman are saying how 'better' the military is in Miramar, than you know little about the Noise of commercial vs. military flights, nor their operations requirements.  Ground traffic is easily far better with the transit paid for by the Feds for "18 connections" from our county's cities.  Look at the transit already built from surrounding, relatively far cities to Phoenix-Mesa & another!  Look at the new transit being built in Utah.

      Sorry Spoonman, your 'Hypocritical' stick your head in the sand logic doesn't work here.  My services will not be here by the time any airport is put in...unfortunately, so there is no 'profits' for me to be making!  And what profits are you making, as a 'Developer?'  Let's unmask the critics, please.

      spoonman
      spoonman subscriber

      @Cindy Conger @msginsd @spoonman huh? Re-read my comments. I'm a huge supporter of an airport at Miramar, and I agree that people like msginsd are sticking their heads in the sand.

      Cindy Conger
      Cindy Conger subscriber

      @msginsd @spoonman Wrong spoonman, I've wanted a new airport for all of San Diego for 35 yrs....when I lived in Mira Mesa.  And long after we're gone from here.  Are you a 'NIMBY' who thinks, or promotes, falsely that an airport in East Elliot would ever 'negatively affect' anyone?  Why don't you put Your Name on your email, so we can see where you live & who you are?  & what FEARs (False Education Appearing Real) you're spreading?

      Cindy Conger
      Cindy Conger subscriber

      And we still question, is the Real purpose, the siphoning of San Diego's untouched Air Cargo landing fees...(ie. $5,000 per 747 landing) to municipalities going to be 'next'  for this 'investment group', at the complete Loss for all of San Diego, its residents and visitors? 

      What could be a $500 million/yr. to $5 Billion/year as a Stable Revenue Source for San Diego City and County, this group plans to 'give away' to Baja Mexico, along with the high-paying Customs-processing, airport employee jobs, as well?  Get a Clue, folks.  The $15-18/per 'crossing' will, with the numbers expected "60% of 4-5 Billion US passengers/yr." will nearly 'cover' in just a couple of years of 'use', the Entire Cost of Zell's $78 million 'investment!'  With another $75 million+ / yr. of San Diego's 'former landing fees' now going to Mexico!  What investors are looking for, high profits, are of little benefit & Extreme Losses for our City, County and people...just Check out the 'backup paperwork' in the original City Council vote for a 'Customs processing and Air Cargo truck bridge' to cross onto TJ's runways from this source.  Let's all 'give away'  the control for San Diego's survival to Mexico, instead of thinking of 'doing it for ourselves' in the middle of the 64,000 acres of East Elliott...to include a real 'transit system' for our county, paid for (18 city connections), by the Federal Government. Talk about "extortion" possiblities?  Already, Mexico has 'squashed any hopes' of 'uber' transportation use to the new terminal?  Wake up folks...what's NEXT?

      Cindy Conger
      Cindy Conger subscriber

      So, since the 'toll road'  went away...a complete 'bust', the groups '$78 million investment'  is Only From the ' development of the Cross Border Terminal?'  "• In the unlikely event that air passenger traffic doesn’t increase, Rose said the group’s $78 million investment is secure based on projected toll collections." from the article in 2010...?

      Cindy Conger
      Cindy Conger subscriber

      Correction to my numbers, based on the 'Cargo flights' & Phoenix landing fee revenues from last year, 2014:   What could be a $500 million/yr. to $5 Billion/year as a Stable Revenue Source for San Diego City and County, this group plans to 'give away' to Baja Mexico, along with the high-paying Customs-processing, airport employee jobs, as well?  Get a Clue, folks.  The $15-18/per 'passenger bridge crossing fee' will, with the numbers expected "60% of 4-5 Billion US passengers/yr."(per recent article in Voice) will nearly 'cover' in just a couple of years of 'use', the Entire Cost of Zell's $78 million 'investment!'  With another $75 million+ / yr. of San Diego's 'former landing fees' now going to Mexico!  What investors are looking for, high profits, are of little benefit & Extreme Losses for our City, County and people...just Check out the 'backup paperwork' in the original City Council vote for a 'Customs processing and Air Cargo truck bridge' to cross onto TJ's runways from this source.  Let's all 'give away'  the control for San Diego's survival to Mexico, instead of thinking of 'doing it for ourselves' in the middle of the 64,000 acres of East Elliott...to include a real 'transit system' for our county, paid for (18 city connections), by the Federal Government. Talk about "extortion" possiblities?  Already, Mexico has 'squashed any hopes' of 'uber' transportation use to the new terminal?  Wake up folks...what's NEXT?