The mayor’s use of his veto power to restore special election funding and take a shot at opponents was a power move that could change the politics of city budgets for years to come. And it was only the latest of many such moves provoked by novel interpretations of, and actual changes to, the City Charter.

Mayor Kevin Faulconer’s veto and cuts to specific Council district budgets send a clear message. But it’s still not at all clear that he’ll prevail in holding his special election, which is up for a vote on Monday. Here are a few things to watch as that unfolds.

Monday, members of the City Council found out that to change the city budget the mayor proposes each year, they ultimately need a supermajority of six votes, not just a simple majority.

A coalition of labor leaders may have killed SoccerCity and upended the mayor’s carefully laid out plan for a November election that would have shaped his legacy and the city for decades.

Mayor Kevin Faulconer’s proposal would raise hotel taxes to fund a convention center expansion, and to fund infrastructure and homelessness solutions. The measure would require two-thirds support from voters. Last week, Brigette Browning, president of the local union of hotel, restaurant and gaming workers, said her union does not support Faulconer’s proposal — and that it might actively oppose it.

Mayor Kevin Faulconer’s actions have netted little in the way of prospects for new housing, let alone provided for the kind of supply increases that might affect affordability. His density bonus program, though, is hailed as a model for other cities.