SANDAG knew a year before the 2004 election that TransNet wouldn’t collect $14 billion, but it didn’t tell voters. This is now the third instance in which SANDAG either knowingly overstated how much money it could collect to pay for transportation projects, or understated how much projects would cost to complete.

SANDAG bet against big, experienced banks like Goldman Sachs and are, so far, losing the bet leaving taxpayers are on the hook for millions. Voice of San Diego’s Andrew Keatts and Ashly McGlone explain how the regional transportation agency bought into an investment called interest-rate swaps. The agency essentially bet that interest rates would rise. Interest rates did not […]

In 2005, SANDAG was looking to maximize the possibilities for Transnet, its newly passed tax measure. So it did what other public agencies were doing: It played around with sophisticated financial arrangements that few understood. Now it has a roughly $100 million liability hanging over its head. Agency leaders say the deal is working as intended.

Chula Vista Mayor Mary Salas backed SANDAG’s Measure A, successfully lobbied for a tax increase in Chula Vista to fund infrastructure upgrades and boosts housing developments in the South Bay and beyond. But both she and Chula Vista still struggle to get a seat at the table when it comes to SANDAG and the projects it oversees.

Smaller cities across San Diego are lining up against AB 805, the measure to remake SANDAG. But the bill’s author, Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez Fletcher, found a way to mention it to Gov. Jerry Brown when he asked her to support his recently passed transportation bill.

SANDAG staffers tried to be forthcoming about the agency’s forecasting failure in an early draft of an op-ed eventually published under SANDAG board chair Ron Roberts’ name, according to emails obtained by Voice of San Diego. The final product obscured the extent of the agency’s error, and introduced an inaccurate claim.