In September, the San Diego County Sheriff’s Department began a one-year pilot program that includes four camera-equipped drones. Despite urging from the ACLU that the Sheriff’s Department first seek input from the public and the County Board of Supervisors, it did neither.

When Mayor Kevin Faulconer announced he’d be heading up the statewide campaign to oppose Proposition 57, a criminal sentencing reform measure, it took some folks by surprise. Faulconer secured two big contributions from San Diego supporters but has been less successful in winning support from the communities most impacted by over-incarceration.

El Cajon Police Chief Jeff Davis has said his office, and the San Diego County district attorney’s office, will both investigate a shooting that took place Tuesday in which a black man killed by police. As that process plays out, here’s what we know about when an officer can legally shoot someone, how the DA approaches the release of shooting videos and how San Diego officers who’ve killed people have been handled in previous cases.

The San Diego Police Department is still conducting curfew sweeps, which happen largely in certain neighborhoods. The department has long held that the sweeps are meant to keep young people safe and to deter crime. Here’s what happened when a VOSD reporter joined SDPD for a curfew sweep ride-along, then returned weeks later to experience another curfew sweep from a community resident’s perspective.

It’s been nearly two years since a state audit found that less than half of all rape kits at three California law enforcement agencies were actually analyzed. Since then, two of the agencies have made it a practice to test all sexual assault kits. The third agency examined in the audit, the San Diego Police Department, is doubling down on its decision to leave many kits untested.

In a sworn deposition obtained by Voice of San Diego, San Diego Police Officer Neal Browder said he did not face any internal discipline or reprimand following an April 2015 incident in which he shot and killed an unarmed, mentally ill man. Browder also said that he was never interviewed by anyone in the district attorney’s office, or anyone in internal affairs, although both offices investigated the incident.

Police records show arrests and citations for encroaching on a public space have soared over the last five years. One of the attorneys who sued the city in 2004 over excessive homelessness enforcement believes police are using encroachment to circumvent the settlement in that case, which allows homeless folks to sleep in certain public spaces from 9 p.m. to 5:30 a.m.

An explosive state audit confirms many of the fears that San Diego Assemblywoman Shirley Weber and others have long expressed about the state’s gang database: that it cannot ensure individuals’ privacy, that people can be entered in the database without proper substantiation and that people are kept in the database long after their names should have been purged.