San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer found a tax hike he likes — specifically an increase to the hotel-room tax to fund a new joint convention center and stadium in East Village. The mayor talked with Scott Lewis Monday about whether he prefers East Village to Mission Valley, how enforceable the concessions he won from the team are and more.

The Chargers are treating Measure C, their plan to build a convadium, as a kind of loyalty test – a plea that San Diego leaders show their support for the football team. But not since the effort to move the airport has San Diego’s business community and elite leaders been so split on a giant civic decision. It’s all left Mayor Kevin Faulconer paralyzed.

Gay Sinclair has been selling off many of the buildings she owns in and around East Village. The one she says she’ll never give up is the historic Wonder Bread building. Yet she might not have a choice. If Measure C passes, there’s a chance the city could use eminent domain to force Sinclair to accept a deal and clear the way for a convadium. It wouldn’t be the first time she’s been forced to surrender a historic building for a stadium.

Episode four of Culturecast, VOSD’s podcast covering the intersection of arts and gentrification in Barrio Logan, explores community members’ fears that Barrio Logan will follow the same trajectory as East Village if the Chargers get their new downtown stadium. They say the arts scene that’s been flourishing in and around Barrio Logan will die if the stadium’s built.

The proposed stadium-convention center wouldn’t be a giveaway to a billionaire; it’s a public-private partnership in which both sides should contribute and both should expect benefits. San Diegans should vote based on the project’s benefits and economic returns for San Diego, not on animosity toward billionaires or any particular one.