Last week, we got a firsthand look at the many ways in which students at East Village High School cheat on the district’s online credit recovery courses. A San Diego Unified spokesman dismissed claims that cheating occurs were merely “anecdotal.” Since then, more teachers and students have come forward with stories that suggest the problem is pervasive.

On a recent visit to an online credit recovery course at a San Diego Unified high school, students — and even teachers — showed us just how easy it is to game the assignments, including Googling the answers in real time, muting lectures and typing gobbledygook in as responses and receiving credit.

Many officials have warned that aging schools are more likely to be at risk of lead exposure. But age alone isn’t a solid indicator. We’ve mapped district schools by age, as well as by the condition of campus facilities. Buildings in bad condition are more likely to have plumbing issues.

If recent numbers are a guide, thousands of students could be at risk of failing to meet new graduation standards that kick in two years from now. But the district says the support system it’s putting in place will fill in the gaps.