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Project One for All, the county’s commitment to house 1,250 of the most vulnerable homeless San Diegans, has helped get dozens off the streets and drawn praise from even some of the most skeptical local advocates. But the much-celebrated initiative has hit some snags in its early months. Confusion has sometimes plagued its implementation.

Homeless veterans are spending weeks and even months seeking homes despite an influx of city and county incentives meant to encourage landlords to welcome them. The slow pace of progress could complicate San Diego’s ability to deliver on its goal to end veteran homelessness by the end of 2017.

The federal government is considering changing the formula by which it doles out funds to combat homelessness. The current setup handicaps San Diego. But at least three cities that benefit from the current arrangement – Chicago, New York and Philadelphia – don’t want it to change, and are vigorously opposing the plans.

East Village is in a moment of massive transition. While the neighborhood’s quickly gentrifying and new people and businesses are moving in, the homeless population is also peaking. The tension between those two camps is on full public view at Fault Line Park.