The chief of San Diego’s Border Patrol section said he can’t disclose what agents look for before stopping someone, but that race and ethnicity don’t come into play. A review of enforcement actions recorded between 2011 and 2014, though, shows agents stopped people for sometimes ambiguous reasons like sitting up straight or driving slowly.

Despite a Sheriff’s Department policy that prohibits deputies from stopping, detaining or questioning people for reasons related to immigration, deputies contacted U.S. Border Patrol during a traffic stop and held the couple until agents arrived on scene to detain them.

San Ysidro’s demographics and its location on the border contribute to a unique set of housing woes. “I can’t get my green card without an address, I can’t work without a green card and I can’t afford an apartment without work,” said one resident whose struggle is familiar to many community members.

SB 54, the so-called sanctuary state bill, would be the most significant change to local immigration enforcement in a decade – and it would come not from President Donald Trump but the state.