Jerry Williams self-reported stormwater pollution from his business to the state, as required by law. Environmental groups sued over the reports, and as the legal fight dragged on, Williams closed shop. Meanwhile, other businesses flout the law, don’t do the monitoring and likely make more in profit.

In recent years, San Diego water officials weren’t even looking at paperwork that showed which businesses were polluting local waterways. With no official enforcement happening, private attorneys and environmentalists have taken matters into their own hands, filing dozens of lawsuits against area companies for violating clean water laws.

Common sense solutions can dramatically reduce the potential for people to come into contact with polluted waters, and can provide multiple benefits to the community.

Having learned its lessons years ago that it is best to lay out just how much money trouble it faces, the city of San Diego is warning investors it will have to come up with nearly $4 billion over two decades to comply with regulations on how it handles stormwater runoff.

A neighborhood activist claimed Barrio Logan has among the highest rates of asthma in San Diego and the state.

A 2003 state law aims to protect school children from harmful traffic pollution. More than three-dozen San Diego County schools sit within the danger zone near major roadways – but they’re all exempt from the law.