San Diego Unified has said the high number of teacher retirements could mean schools in wealthier neighborhoods may be impacted by the turnover just as much as low-income schools. But even once layoff notices are rescinded, the process has a bigger impact on low-income schools, which tend to have more junior employees.

San Diego Unified School District Superintendent Cindy Marten said Tuesday that teacher layoffs for the 2017-2018 school year may drop below 200, down from 952 notices this spring. Marten offered no other explanation, and district staff said this week final layoff numbers are not yet available.

District documents show the early retirement deals for 600 non-teaching employees would cost more than $24.4 million. But those numbers include the costs to replace every retiree – something officials said the district does not plan to do.

Listening to San Diego Unified explain its budget cuts, you might think the district’s massive shortfall is actually a blessing. To better understand what’s going on, we’ve put together a video that explains why this happened and demystifies the district’s spin efforts.

Statement: “We’ve already cut over 2,000 staff in the last few years,” San Diego Unified school board President John Lee Evans said during a June 19 interview on KPBS.Determination: Mostly True