I’m headed out to a high school today and hoping I can brush up on my algebra while I’m at it. Thank goodness it’s your Friday education newsblitz!

We report on a new way of evaluating principals that would take test scores, attendance and dozens of other factors into account. That could prove controversial with the new principals union. The North County Times writes that schools are on the alert for swine flu.

The Sacramento Bee reports on school kitchens that were shut down by the health department and the job crunch for substitute teachers. Conservative parents in the Bay Area are suing schools over an anti-bullying curriculum that discusses gay, lesbian and transgender people, the Alameda Journal writes.

In the Los Angeles Times, a former school district employee argues that student achievement has to be linked to teacher evaluation if we want schools to improve. And Nightline zeroes in on Locke High, the troubled Los Angeles school that has been taken over by a system of charter schools. Television crews stuck around with the school for a year, recording small victories, as well as the big challenges that remain.

Education Week reports that it will take each state an estimated 642 hours just to fill out an application for those extra, competitively awarded stimulus dollars for schools. (Maybe it’s a good thing that California might be disqualified?) And the Teacher Beat blog explains why teachers are data rich but information poor — nobody is training them to effectively use all the data they have.

EMILY ALPERT

    This article relates to: Education

    Written by Voice of San Diego

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