There was a lot to be worried about in this recent UCLA report on how budget cuts have impacted California high schools. A summer survey of almost a quarter of high school principals in the state found that 49 percent said they’d shortened the school year and 74 percent said class sizes had grown.

But perhaps the most alarming nugget was this one:

Also, 88 percent of principals said the budget cuts have all but halted their school reform efforts, as key staff have been let go and time for professional development has been eliminated.

I’ve been noticing this trend too. When I visit San Diego schools, some are so flustered with budget cuts that it’s hard to get people to talk about changing instruction or trying new things. Is your school pushing forward with good changes even as budgets are cut? Or has less money meant less attention to fixing what needs fixing? Please let me know what’s happening at your school.

Please contact Emily Alpert directly at emily.alpert@voiceofsandiego.org or 619.550.5665 and follow her on Twitter: twitter.com/emilyschoolsyou.

    This article relates to: Education, News

    Written by Emily Alpert

    4 comments
    John de Beck
    John de Beck subscriber

    I can't see privatization as a solution for a democratic society, but I could see a redesign of public education that focused on material rewards for students who achieve. What I do see is the need to review our priotities, because we can't keep doing the same thing over and over.. Either we adapt, or we find public education will die on its own.... survival of the fittest? I don't think many school boards are in the mood to adapt.....they owe too much to their political supporters.

    deBeck
    deBeck

    I can't see privatization as a solution for a democratic society, but I could see a redesign of public education that focused on material rewards for students who achieve. What I do see is the need to review our priotities, because we can't keep doing the same thing over and over.. Either we adapt, or we find public education will die on its own.... survival of the fittest? I don't think many school boards are in the mood to adapt.....they owe too much to their political supporters.

    Mark Giffin
    Mark Giffin subscribermember

    From where I sat it was a joke

    mgland
    mgland

    From where I sat it was a joke