As part of a crackdown on illegal marijuana dispensaries, San Diego police conducted a raid on Aug. 2 and arrested 12 employees for illegally selling and distributing marijuana.

They were targeting an unauthorized delivery service, and they found cocaine on site. But the bust brought up the long-simmering question about whether any delivery services are legal in San Diego.

Because there are a lot of them. Hundreds of marijuana delivery services are operating in San Diego. The Aug. 2 raid was a sign that was about to change.

In February, the San Diego City Council decided it would only allow permitted marijuana dispensaries to operate delivery services.

If that’s now being enforced, it means hundreds of unlicensed delivery services currently operating – a listing of many can be found on sites like Weedmaps – will be in the crosshairs of police and may end up consolidating.

Starting in 2018, the commercial sale of marijuana will be allowed across the state as part of Prop. 64, which was passed by voters last November. Local lawmakers are busy creating regulations to accommodate the measure, or to outright ban marijuana sales.


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Delivery is obviously popular but the city’s vague enforcement policies have until now allowed a major proliferation of dispensaries to occur.

“There are between 200 and 300 delivery services operating in San Diego. We would estimate about 10 percent of those or maybe 20 percent at the high end are doing everything that they need to do,” said Elizabeth Wilhelm, CEO of the San Diego Cannabis Delivery Alliance.

Businesses that have been approved by the city and have a physical location are the only ones allowed to deliver pot right to a customer’s doorstep.

At the state level, Senate Bill 94 – which includes clear rules for independent delivery services – was signed into law in June by Gov. Jerry Brown. Wilhelm hopes the city will start implementing some of those same regulations.

She said she supports the city’s effort to crack down on the black market of delivery services.

“Our organization is all about taxation and regulation, we believe in that,” she said. “What we’re saying is, ‘Because you’re black market now, you have a choice: Do things right or go away.”

The San Diego City Council is set to discuss further regulation on Sept. 11. For now, we’ve come up with a list of all the legal dispensaries in San Diego and noted which ones currently deliver.

If the only legal delivery services are the ones attached to permitted dispensaries, then we were only able to confirm that there are eight legal delivery services. That’s far fewer than the 30 to 60 that Wilhelm estimated had done everything needed to comply.

Here is a map and listing of dispensaries in the city of San Diego we were able to confirm are permitted, operating and offer delivery.

A Green Alternative

2335 Roll Dr.

Apothekare

5125 Convoy St.

Harbor MMCC

2405 Harbor Dr.

Mankind Cooperative

7128 Miramar Rd.

(Mankind‘s sister company, Green Nectar, has a business tax certificate for packaging and processing cannabis, which means it can deliver. We were unable to get a definitive answer as to how the two businesses are associated.)

Point Loma Patients CC

3452 Hancock St.

Southwestern Patient Group

658 E. San Ysidro Blvd.

Torrey Holistics

10671 Roselle St.

*Delivery operated through the EAZE mobile app

Urbn Leaf

1028 Buenos Ave.

3385 Sunrise St. (Coming Soon)

    This article relates to: Business, Government, Land Use, Marijuana, Must Reads

    Written by Adriana Heldiz

    Adriana Heldiz is Voice of San Diego’s Assistant Digital Manager. She makes videos and helps manage the organization’s online presence. Adriana can be reached at adriana.heldiz@voiceofsandiego.org.

    4 comments
    bgetzel
    bgetzel subscriber

    Why doesn't the City merely enforce the payment of taxes by all the delivery services, rather than put most of them out of business? Isn't that the way the City operates with respect to other types of businesses? It appears that the City's selective approach is likely to create a cannibis oligopoly.

    Desde la Logan
    Desde la Logan subscriber

    And these eight are supposed to serve the entire city of San Diego? Ridiculous.