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What It's Like to Free an Innocent Man

On this week’s podcasts, we cover the flailing of the DeMaio team, Phil BBQ’s take on minimum wage and the democratic process, the long-incubated work of the California Innocence Project and how creepy dudes are.

It’s hard to overstate our Hero of the Week’s hero status this week.

The California Innocence Project at California Western School of Law has been working since 1999 to overturn Michael Hanline’s 1980 murder conviction. Hanline spent 36 years behind bars – 36 years, from age 33 to 69 – for a crime he didn’t commit. We read about the case and had to know more. So for the second half of this week’s show, neatly cut for you in the second clip below, we talked with Innocence Project associate director Alex Simpson.

But first, we had to address the flailing of Carl DeMaio’s campaign communications director Dave McCulloch, and truth be told, the campaign as a whole. Earlier this week, McCulloch publicly challenged KPBS on whether the second staffer to accuse DeMaio of sexual harassment, Justin Harper, was the real Justin Harper. KPBS pretty quickly knocked that conspiracy theory off the table when they interviewed Harper on Skype, where he flashed appropriate identification. That’s just the latest in a string of dubious excuses and explanations, which we get into in the first half of the show.

Check out the roundtable first half of the show here.

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Want to skip straight to our in-depth Q-and-A with Alex Simpson of the Innocence Project? Listen to the interview here, and stick around for our wrap-up chat: In light of a recent rash of sexual misconduct allegations against prominent figures like Bill Cosby and former CBC host Jian Ghomeshi, how creepy are dudes?

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Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or Stitcher for easy delivery to your smartphone every week. And if your company’s interested in sponsoring the show, reach out to VOSD’s Emily Tillson.

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